Join us June 14

SIT logo with green circleContact: Kate Casa kate.casa@sit.edu; 802-258-3527 or 916-396-0036

June 6, 2018

June 14 event will celebrate CONTACT peacebuilders

BRATTLEBORO, Vermont – SIT invites the community to join us on Thursday, June 14, to celebrate 21 years of peacebuilding through CONTACT, a program that teaches conflict transformation through academic instruction and personal interaction.

Pink, Blue and yellow post-it notesThe event will include a concert with Mary Cay Brass and the River Singers and Greenfield Harmony choirs and brief remarks by current and past CONTACT participants and program director Bruce Dayton. It starts at 7:30 p.m. in the Lowey International Center on the SIT campus, 1 Kipling Road, Brattleboro.

CONTACT is a three-week professional and academic training program that teaches the core ideas of conflict transformation. It’s led by internationally recognized faculty with years of experience in the field, as well as leaders from Musicians Without Borders, an NGO that uses music to bridge divides, build community, and heal the wounds of war.

The 2018 program, which kicked off June 4, includes more than 30 peacemakers from conflict and post-conflict zones around the world including Rwanda, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nepal. They work in education, development, the arts, refugee support services and community and religious organizations.

“Conflict transformation training is most effective when it combines skills-based academic instruction with personal interaction between peacebuilders across ethnic, national, religious, and cultural divides,” said Dayton, who also chairs the Peace and Justice Leadership MA degree program at SIT Graduate Institute.

CONTACT participants explore conflict analysis, social identity and conflict, peacebuilding interventions, post-conflict reconciliation, intercultural communications, gender and peacebuilding, mediation, negotiation, dialogue, policy advocacy, peacebuilding through the arts, nonviolent social action, and monitoring and evaluation.

In addition to Dayton, the CONTACT program is led by internationally recognized faculty with years of experience in the field, as well as leaders from Musicians Without Borders, an NGO that uses music to bridge divides, build community, and heal the wounds of war.

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