Uganda: Post-Conflict Transformation

Coursework

Prerequisites:
Although there are no prerequisites, students should have an understanding of issues related to conflict/genocide theories and exhibit the sensitivity and psychological and emotional maturity required to deal with these difficult and intense subjects. Learning of regional conflict, genocide, and its aftermath not only through lectures but also through field excursions and from those individuals and communities most immediately affected may, at times, be upsetting and difficult to experience.

Access Virtual Library Guide

Contextualizing Conflict in Northern Uganda - syllabus (PDF)
(AFRS 3000 / 3 credits / 45 class hours)
This multidisciplinary course is designed to offer students the contextual and contemporary circumstances surrounding conflict in Uganda by exploring social, political, economic, cultural, linguistic, and ecological issues. The course examines issues of national and ethnic identity and the role of these constructions in conflict. In addition to the main focus on Northern Uganda, the course provides a comparative approach to conflict in the region. Lectures contextualize the roots and impact of conflict in the Great Lakes region, while an excursion to Rwanda provides the context for a comparative view of post-genocide transformation. Course lecturers include leading Uganda academics and professionals working in the areas of post-conflict transformation, justice, and development.

Post-Conflict Transformation - syllabus (PDF)
(PEAC 3000 / 3 credits / 45 class hours)
The Post-Conflict Transformation course is multidisciplinary and designed to introduce students to the contemporary circumstances of post-conflict transformation and peace building in Uganda. This course also explores issues of internally displaced people and refugees and analyzes institutional and cultural processes of peace restoration and community building. The course provides a comparative approach to post-conflict transformation in the region and includes an excursion to Rwanda to contrast the post-genocide environment of Kigali with Gulu. Course lecturers include leading Uganda academics and professionals working in the areas of post-conflict transformation, justice, and development.

Intensive Language Study: Acholi - syllabus (PDF)
(ACHO 1000 / 3 credits/ 45 class hours)
Emphasis on introductory speaking and comprehension skills through classroom and field instruction. Formal instruction is augmented by language practice with host families during the homestay.

Research Methods and Ethics - syllabus (PDF)
(ANTH 3500 / 3 credits / 45 class hours)
This is a qualitative research design course designed to provide an overview of methodological field study approaches within the local cultural context, affording students the tools necessary to conduct field research in Uganda. The course is designed with three main objectives. First, the course addresses the various methodologies and techniques required to carry out the Independent Study Project (ISP). Issues including ethical considerations, observation strategies, interviewing techniques, and designing and writing a manuscript are discussed to prepare students for the ISP. Second, the course addresses the World Learning/SIT Human Subjects Review process and its role in primary field research. In addition to detailing the processes and parameters of research ethics, the course focuses on issues of Internally Displaced People (IDP) and refugee camps and seeks to reverse the gaze back to the observer so he or she will be more self-conscious of his or her position in such spaces. Lectures and discussions analyze the manner in which these communities are addressing community building and reconciliation with the intention of providing students with tools and techniques to work with people in post-conflict zones. Third, the seminar seeks to address the emotional and psychological impact of working and learning in post-conflict communities. As a result, additional time is allotted to this course to provide students with ample opportunities to be briefed and debriefed for refugee and IDP camp visits, and to allow sessions for students to actively process their experiences.

Independent Study Project - syllabus (PDF)
(ISPR 3000 / 4 credits / 120 class hours)
Conducted in Gulu or another approved location in Uganda appropriate to the project. Sample topic areas: migration in northern Uganda; peace camp curriculum; national holidays and celebrations as markers of identity development; local perspectives on peace negotiations; print and radio coverage of conflict in Uganda; traditional political structures; economic dimensions of conflict; traditional justice systems; challenges of post-conflict reconstruction; gender and conflict; the politics of conflict memory; counseling and psychosocial support in post-conflict environments. Students complete either a research-based Independent Study Project (ISP) or a practicum-based ISP with a local NGO or association working in the area of peace building, sustainable reconciliation, or post-conflict development. The two ISP options allow students to either reflect conceptually through field study on post-conflict achievements and community building in northern Uganda, or to gain practical experience with a local NGO or community-based association.

Sample research-based ISP topics include: Migration in northern Uganda; peace camp curriculum; national holidays and celebrations as markers of identity development; local perspectives on peace negotiations; print and radio coverage of conflict in Uganda; traditional political structures; economic dimensions of conflict; traditional justice systems; challenges of post-conflict reconstruction; gender and conflict; the politics of conflict memory; counseling and psychosocial support in post-conflict environments.

Sample practicum sites include: Human Rights Focus; Caritas; Concerned Parents Association; St. Mary’s Hospital Lacor; Invisible Children; Acholi Cultural Institution (Ker Kwaro); Kitgum Youth Center; Straight Talk Foundation; TASO Counseling Center; Gulu Women's Economic Development and Globalization (GWED-G); Gulu Local District Council; The Center for Conflict Resolution in the Great Lakes Region; Norwegian Refugee Council; and War Child Canada.


Costs Dates



Credits: 16

Duration: 15 weeks

Program Base: Gulu

Language Study: Acholi

Prerequisites: Coursework in conflict theories recommended. Read more...

View Student Evaluations for this program:

About the Evaluations (PDF)

Fall 2013 Evaluations (PDF)
Spring 2013 Evaluations (PDF)
Fall 2012 Evaluations (PDF)


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