Tatsushi Arai

PhD, George Mason University
MA, Monterey Institute of International Studies
BA, Waseda University, Japan


Associate Professor, Peacebuilding and Conflict Transformation
Intercultural Service, Leadership, and Management
Dr. Tatsushi (Tats) Arai is a scholar-practitioner of conflict resolution, sustainable development, and cross-cultural communication with seventeen years of international experience. Currently, he is an associate professor of peacebuilding and conflict transformation at SIT Graduate Institute in Vermont and a fellow of the Center for Peacemaking Practice, the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University in Virginia. Previously, Dr. Arai taught international relations at the National University of Rwanda in the aftermath of the 1994 genocide. As a trainer, mediator, and dialogue facilitator, he has designed and facilitated a number of dialogues and workshops on peace and conflict-related issues for political leaders, diplomats, military and peacekeeping professionals, civil society and religious leaders, and representatives of international organizations. Dr. Arai has worked extensively in the United States, the Middle East, the African Great Lakes, South Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia, and has conducted field research in Europe.

Dr. Arai’s scholarship explores the link between theory and practice. His recent publications include “Rebuilding Pakistan in the Aftermath of the Floods: Disaster Relief as Conflict Prevention” in Journal of Peacebuilding and Development (2012), “Development Sensitivity for Reconciliation: Lessons Learned from Rwanda” in Conflict Trends (2012), and “Activating Peace Potential in Youth-Led Civil Society Dialogues Across the Taiwan Strait” in New Paradigms of Peace Research: The Asia-Pacific Context (2013). His book Creativity and Conflict Resolution: Alternative Pathways to Peace (2009, Routledge) examines patterns of group-based creativity based on a comparative analysis of seventeen cases. His most recent publication, Clash of National Identities: China, Japan, and the East China Sea Territorial Dispute (2013, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars), with S. Goto and Z. Wang as co-editors, provides a multi-angled analysis of the security crisis and offers concrete policy proposals.

Dr. Arai’s current research and applied practice focus on (1) the transformation of existential conflict, (2) the link between sustainable development and conflict transformation, (3) the role of Asian religions, especially Buddhism, in peacemaking, and (4) alternative methods of experiential learning. 

Dr. Arai is a Japanese citizen and lives in Western Massachusetts with his tri-national family.

View Dr. Arai's publications and activities for public outreach.